Maya Medich & Lemez Lovas: Music censorship in Belarus

MAYA MEDICH & LEMEZ LOVAS
(United Kingdom)

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Maya Medich and Lemez Lovas are authors of the Freemuse report about music censorship in Belarus which was published in November 2006, entitled ‘Hidden Truths’.

This video is a five-minutes excerpt of their one-hour presentation launching the report, explaining the mechanisms of censorship in Belarus. The presentation took place at the 3rd Freemuse World Conference in Istanbul, Turkey.  






Anthropologist Maya Medich was born in Yugoslavia (now Bosnia and Herzegovina) in 1974, and is based in UK where she studied at Kingston University, and School of Oriental and African Studies at University of London. She specialises in research on civil society and the state in post-communist countries. Partner in London-based production and distribution company of Central and Eastern European independent documentary film.

British musician, composer, DJ and journalist Lemez Lovas was born in 1976. Studied at Oxford University, Gnessin Conservatory of Music, Moscow and School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. Writes for various magazines and broadcasts regularly on BBC World Service English and Russian services on politics and culture in the former Soviet Union. Has written original scores for theatre and television. Founding member and band-leader of Oi Va Voi (V2 Records).

The video was recorded by members of Freedom of Expression Association on 26 November 2006, and edited by Mik Aidt. The signature music by Jason Carter was recorded live at the conference. 

Click to hear the audio track

Click to read more about the Freemuse conference

Click to read about the Belarus report

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