Sweden: The conference ‘Right! Freedom of Music & Speech’

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Sweden:


International conference on music, revolution and authors’ rights

How can we support authors and musicians in the face of censorship and repression? Are authors free to express their minds in our modern, digital world? And how is freedom of expression connected to authors’ rights?

The questions will be investigated at the international conference ‘Right! Freedom of Music & Speech’ held at Södra Teatern in Stockholm, Sweden, on 21 November 2011.

We want you to attend! Sign up at right11.se/rsvp.

The conference begins at 09:15 am and ends at 05:30 pm. Post conference mingle and bar until midnight. Detailed schedule at right11.se.

Free attendance but places are limited — sign up today! And read more about the programme below…
 

2011 has been a year of social uprising. From the Arab Spring to the summer riots in the UK and the Occupy Wall Street movement of the fall. What role did music play in all this?

With his song ‘Irhal’ (Leave), Ramy Essam created a soundtrack to the Egyptian revolution. On 21 November, Ramy Essam joins Right! Freedom of Music & Speech to talk about the dramatic days on Tahrir Square in February earlier this year.

On the same occasion Ramy Essam will also receive the Freemuse Award 2011 from the nonprofit organisation Freemuse. The Freemuse Award Committee wrote: “Ramy Essam played an important role during the Egyptian revolution and suffered severe beatings and torture as a consequence. He personifies the powerful role that music played in the Arab Spring.”

The conference is organised by SKAP — The Swedish Society of Popular Music Composers. Below you can see a newsletter from SKAP:



Sweden


 

Skap

Right! Freedom of Music & Speech

 

 

Right!

Welcome to Södra Teatern, Stockholm, November 21st 

2011 has been a year of social uprising. From the Arab Spring to the summer riots in the UKand the Occupy Wall Street movement of the fall. What role did music play in all this?

"Right! Freedom of Music & Speech" is an international conference on music, revolution and authors’ rights. Arranged by SKAP – The Swedish Society of Popular Music Composers – the conference asks the following questions: How political is music in 2011? How can we support authors and musicians in the face of censorship and repression? Are authors free to express their minds in our modern, digital world? And how is freedom of expression connected to authors’ rights?

We want you to attend! Sign up at right11.se/rsvp.

The conference begins at 09:15 am and ends at 05:30 pm. Post conference mingle and bar until midnight. Detailed schedule at right11.se.

Free attendance but places are limited – sign up today! And read more about the program in this e-mail. 

Ramy Essam – The Voice of the Egyptian Revolution
With his song "Irhal" ("Leave"), Ramy Essam created a soundtrack to the Egyptian revolution. On November 21st, Ramy Essam joins "Right! Freedom of Music & Speech" to talk about the dramatic days on Tahrir Square in February earlier this year.

Ramy Essam will also receive the Freemuse Award from the nonprofit organization Freemuse. Freemuse advocates freedom of expression for musicians around the world. The Freemuse Award Committee: “Ramy Essam played an important role during the Egyptian revolution and suffered severe beatings and torture as a consequence. He personifies the powerful role that music played in the Arab Spring.”

 

 

Authors and panels at "Right! Freedom of Music & Speech" 

Peaches, Peter Dolving, Fuat Talay

Author keynotes

The Canadian artist Peaches. A revolutionary figure in 21st century electronic music, Peaches has become one the most significant feminist icons in the music industry.

The Turkish singer and composer Fuat Talay. Talay’s personal experiences with music censorship in Turkey led to his imprisonment and exile.

Peter Dolving, frontman and singer of the widely acclaimed metal band The Haunted. Dolvings’ outspokenness has resulted in hate campaigns, record burnings and death threats.

The panels include:

Songs of protest – The political power of music in 2011
Were there premonitions of what was to come in Lethal Bizzle’s grime music? The British writers and Guardian journalists Dorian Lynskey and Dan Hancox discuss the uprisings inEngland this summer. Also on the panel: Uje Brandelius, singer and songwriter in Swedish pop-band Doktor Kosmos now working professionally for the Swedish political party Vänsterpartiet, Sharon Vaughn, Nashville songwriter and former partner of Dolly Parton, and Andres Lokko, music and culture journalist and member of Swedish satire and comedy group Killinggänget.

Songs of protest

The democratic web – Authors’ rights in the digital world 
Are authors free to express their minds in our modern, digital society? Journalist and writer Andreas Ekström talks about Google, online anonymity and hate speech with Tova Wellton, DJ and blogger, Helienne Lindvall, composer and journalist, Sam Sundberg, journalist and author of "The Pirates – The Swedish File-Sharers Who Plundered Hollywood" and Professor of Civil Law Jan Rosén.

Panel The democratic web

Expanding the boundaries – Amplifying music in the face of censorship
American philosopher Austin Dacey speaks about "The Impossible Music Sessions", a project that feature the artists who cannot appear and the music that they are not free to make. The Impossible Music Sessions connect artists, producers and audiences for the purpose of expanding the boundaries of creative expression. Austin Dacey talks with Ahmad Zatari, initiator and arranger of Music Freedom Day in Amman, Jordan, and Mansour Hosseini, producer of "Voices of Change", where censored authors and artists from around the world performs on stage in Sweden.

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Furthermore, Ole Reitov, Programme Director of Freemuse, gives a crash course in music censorship.

Gunnar Petri, author and Chairman of Stim, and Marie Korpe, Executive Manager of Freemuse, discuss the relationship between freedom of expression and authors’ rights.

Kerstin Brunnberg, Chairman of the Swedish Arts Council, talks about the fact that there are a number of democratic countries that provide safe havens for book writers. It is time to give repressed music authors the same possibilty.

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Alfons Karabuda, Chairman of SKAP, invites you to "Right!" 

Right!

Right!

 

SKAP – Svenska Kompositörer Av Populärmusik – är Sveriges intresseförening för yrkesverksamma kompositörer, textförfattare och arrangörer. SKAP grundades 1926. Idag har SKAP 929 medlemmar som verkar inom alla genrer.

 


UPDATE

Video from the conference

right11.se/videos

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