Syria: 35 top artists reported to have left the country

NEWS

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Syria:
35 top artists reported to have left the country

Within just three months, 35 artists from the first row of stars in Syria have decided to move to recidences outside of the country, reported SyrianRevolution.org on 24 October 2011.

According to a press statement from the Syrian Association of Artists, this is a signal from these artists of their position to the protests which take place in Syria.

An anonymous source is quoted as saying that approximately half of the artists are now in the Gulf states, a quarter are now in Egypt and Lebanon, waiting to see how the current situation in Syria will develop, while the rest have travelled to Europe and the US.

Condemning the regime
Some of the artists have been open about their position in favour of the uprise.

Samih Choucair wrote ‘Aahiv’ – a song which is said to have inflamed the protesters in Syria and is sung even in the mosques, and Asalah Nasri wrote ‘If only this throne could speak’ where she attacks the Syrian president Bashar Al-Assad and his regime.

Mohammed Al-Rashi and Mohammad Owusu have taken part in demonstrations condemning the regime and offered condolences to the families of killed protesters in more than one place of Damascus.

Another section of artists, however, stand against the revolution and incite demonstrators, most notably Abbas Al Nouri, Slav Fawakherji and Susan Najm al-Din.


 

 
 

Asalah Nasri



Syria

Within just three months, 35 artists from the first row of stars in Syria have decided to move to recidences outside of the country, reported SyrianRevolution.org on 24 October 2011.

According to a press statement from the Syrian Association of Artists, this is a signal from these artists of their position to the protests which take place in Syria.

An anonymous source is quoted as saying that approximately half of the artists are now in the Gulf states, a quarter are now in Egypt and Lebanon, waiting to see how the current situation in Syria will develop, while the rest have travelled to Europe and the US.

Condemning the regime
Some of the artists have been open about their position in favour of the uprise.

Samih Choucair wrote ‘Aahiv’ – a song which is said to have inflamed the protesters in Syria and is sung even in the mosques, and Asalah Nasri wrote ‘If only this throne could speak’ where she attacks the Syrian president Bashar Al-Assad and his regime.

Mohammed Al-Rashi and Mohammad Owusu have taken part in demonstrations condemning the regime and offered condolences to the families of killed protesters in more than one place of Damascus.

Another section of artists, however, stand against the revolution and incite demonstrators, most notably Abbas Al Nouri, Slav Fawakherji and Susan Najm al-Din.


 

 
 

Asalah Nasri



Syria

The Syrian singer Asalah Nasri (also frequently spelled: Asala or Assala Nasry) witnessed the 25 January revolution in Egypt which ousted Mubarak, and perhaps this tempted her to stand up against the government’s crackdown on protesters back in her own country, especially after the number of deaths there exceeded 3,000.

In an interview on Al-Arabiya’s morning tv show, Asalah Nasri said that she and millions of others throughout Syria were not convinced by claims that the revolutionists are criminals and vandals. She added that she wrote the song to voice her opinion on what is happening in her country.

“We are people asking for our most basic rights; we want a country we belong to, can be proud of, that we own a small part of. We don’t feel that it belongs to one person because a country cannot be owned by a single person, and cannot be named after one person,” she said.

The song’s lyrics address the Syrian president, saying:

    “Every throne has been smashed
    learn your lesson.
    Knowledge will not be of any use to you
    the people have stopped listening to you
    the killings will not benefit you.

    We kept quiet about injustice
    don’t say you didn’t know when injury knows.
    I want to give you honest advice
    staying won’t work.
    We were oppressed, and oppression made us learn.”

In mid-May 2011 Asalah Nasri wrote a ‘Letter to Syrian Revolutionists’ which was circulated on several websites. In the letter, Nasri announced that she was refusing to travel back to Syria to take part in the ‘pro-Assad dramas’. “The government and army will pay dearly for the torture and violence they are committing against the protesters,” she added.

In early September Asalah Nasri released the song ‘If only this throne could speak’, and since then several videos attacking her have been uploaded on YouTube. She was also targeted in a defamation campaign launched by a group of pro-government hackers known as the Syrian Electronic Army, and she has faced a campaign of criticism from Syrian celebrities who are loyal to the regime.

Some stars have called her ungrateful to the Al-Assad family, while others have demanded that she be stripped of her Syrian nationality.

Supporters of the uprising on the other hand have called her the ‘Singer of the Syrian Revolution’.

New album
Asalah Nasri plans to release a new album in early 2012 where the singer has collaborated with a number of poets and musicians, including Ayman Bahjat and Muhammad Deyaa.

Her Facebook profile is very frequently updated with news and personal posts, and Asalah Nasri also hosts a tv show, aired on a Dubai channel, which is produced by her husband, director Tareq Al-Arian.


 
 
 

Asalah Nasri

The Syrian singer Asalah Nasri (also frequently spelled: Asala or Assala Nasry) witnessed the 25 January revolution in Egypt which ousted Mubarak, and perhaps this tempted her to stand up against the government’s crackdown on protesters back in her own country, especially after the number of deaths there exceeded 3,000.

In an interview on Al-Arabiya’s morning tv show, Asalah Nasri said that she and millions of others throughout Syria were not convinced by claims that the revolutionists are criminals and vandals. She added that she wrote the song to voice her opinion on what is happening in her country.

“We are people asking for our most basic rights; we want a country we belong to, can be proud of, that we own a small part of. We don’t feel that it belongs to one person because a country cannot be owned by a single person, and cannot be named after one person,” she said.

The song’s lyrics address the Syrian president, saying:

    “Every throne has been smashed
    learn your lesson.
    Knowledge will not be of any use to you
    the people have stopped listening to you
    the killings will not benefit you.

    We kept quiet about injustice
    don’t say you didn’t know when injury knows.
    I want to give you honest advice
    staying won’t work.
    We were oppressed, and oppression made us learn.”

In mid-May 2011 Asalah Nasri wrote a ‘Letter to Syrian Revolutionists’ which was circulated on several websites. In the letter, Nasri announced that she was refusing to travel back to Syria to take part in the ‘pro-Assad dramas’. “The government and army will pay dearly for the torture and violence they are committing against the protesters,” she added.

In early September Asalah Nasri released the song ‘If only this throne could speak’, and since then several videos attacking her have been uploaded on YouTube. She was also targeted in a defamation campaign launched by a group of pro-government hackers known as the Syrian Electronic Army, and she has faced a campaign of criticism from Syrian celebrities who are loyal to the regime.

Some stars have called her ungrateful to the Al-Assad family, while others have demanded that she be stripped of her Syrian nationality.

Supporters of the uprising on the other hand have called her the ‘Singer of the Syrian Revolution’.

New album
Asalah Nasri plans to release a new album in early 2012 where the singer has collaborated with a number of poets and musicians, including Ayman Bahjat and Muhammad Deyaa.

Her Facebook profile is very frequently updated with news and personal posts, and Asalah Nasri also hosts a tv show, aired on a Dubai channel, which is produced by her husband, director Tareq Al-Arian.


 
 
 

Asalah Nasri

Sources in Arabic

syrianrevolution.org

facebook.com/Asalah.Nasri.Official.Page

Sources in Arabic

syrianrevolution.org

facebook.com/Asalah.Nasri.Official.Page

Sources in English

Al Bawaba – 6 September 2011:

‘Syrian singer against Assad’

Yallafinance.com – 4 September 2011:

‘Syrian Singer Asala Nasri challenges Bashar Al-Assad’

Al Bawaba – 21 May 2011:

‘Asalah defies Syrian government’

Profile in Wikipedia – the open encyclopedia:

wikipedia.org/wiki/Assala_Nasri

Sources in English

Al Bawaba – 6 September 2011:

‘Syrian singer against Assad’

Yallafinance.com – 4 September 2011:

‘Syrian Singer Asala Nasri challenges Bashar Al-Assad’

Al Bawaba – 21 May 2011:

‘Asalah defies Syrian government’

Profile in Wikipedia – the open encyclopedia:

wikipedia.org/wiki/Assala_Nasri

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Related reading on freemuse.org