It can be cool to be censored

NEWS

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NEWS

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Click to see the gallery
‘Gallery of bans’

The Australian newspaper The Daily Telegraph has created a gallery of 22 banned bands and artists – from the serious to the ridiculous

Click to see gallery

‘This stunning singer has joined the ranks of rockers, rappers and pop bands deemed disturbing enough to be banned by politicians – and has achieved global recognition as a result,’ writes The Daily Telegraph

Click to see the gallery
‘Gallery of bans’

The Australian newspaper The Daily Telegraph has created a gallery of 22 banned bands and artists – from the serious to the ridiculous

Click to see gallery

‘This stunning singer has joined the ranks of rockers, rappers and pop bands deemed disturbing enough to be banned by politicians – and has achieved global recognition as a result,’ writes The Daily Telegraph


It can be cool to be censored

When an artist is banned, it often sparks intense media intention and publicity. Here are just a few examples

Bahrain: Bahrain’s Islamist-dominated parliament approved an urgent motion asking the government to ban a performance by Lebanese singer Haifa Wehbe, known for her sexy looks and revealing outfits. Websites and publications across the globe, that had until then never heard of Haifa Wehbe, went ballistic with the story, but the government, however, did apparently not ban her concert, and after all the media attention the concert turned into a sellout. Haifa Wehbe’s new international fame raised speculation that she may now make a move into Western showbiz.

China: To be censored has become a marketing factor or marketing stategy for the Chinese musicians, according to musician Christiaan Virant. The phenomena is seen even more clearly in the film industry: Chinese script writers and film producers actually hope to see their work censored because the Western film industry seems to love forbidden films from China – regardless of their actual quality. The banned film producer becomes stereotyped as a “political fighter” and if done intelligently then he or she can profit from this in the West. The very same tendency can be found in the pop music industry.

Taiwan: A religious group in Taiwan managed to get the goverment to ban the singer and rapper Singa Rinpoche from entering the country for one year. However, the ban only increased his popularity among the young Taiwanese audience, and it was said to have promoted the sales of his album.

USA: The American country band Dixie Chicks caused uproar among many US country music fans for saying they were “ashamed” of President George Bush, resulting in death threats, radio censorship, boycotts, cancelled shows and plunging record sales. They were labelled as “Nashville refugees”. Most likely as a result of it all – not to mention the documentary film about the incident, ‘Shut Up & Sing’ – the group was celebrated with five prizes at the 49th annual Grammy Awards in USA on 11 February 2007.

USA: When webloggers started mentioning the word ‘banned’, the news about Stuck Mojo‘s new music video spread quickly. The popular web sites iFilm and YouTube were claimed to have censored their anti-jihad music video, and as the censorship debate continued, it also increased media attention for the band – a controversial rap metal group from Atlanta, Georgia. Soon band leader and guitarist Rich Ward appeared as a guest on Fox News’ tv show “The Big Story with John Gibson”.




It can be cool to be censored

When an artist is banned, it often sparks intense media intention and publicity. Here are just a few examples

Bahrain: Bahrain’s Islamist-dominated parliament approved an urgent motion asking the government to ban a performance by Lebanese singer Haifa Wehbe, known for her sexy looks and revealing outfits. Websites and publications across the globe, that had until then never heard of Haifa Wehbe, went ballistic with the story, but the government, however, did apparently not ban her concert, and after all the media attention the concert turned into a sellout. Haifa Wehbe’s new international fame raised speculation that she may now make a move into Western showbiz.

China: To be censored has become a marketing factor or marketing stategy for the Chinese musicians, according to musician Christiaan Virant. The phenomena is seen even more clearly in the film industry: Chinese script writers and film producers actually hope to see their work censored because the Western film industry seems to love forbidden films from China – regardless of their actual quality. The banned film producer becomes stereotyped as a “political fighter” and if done intelligently then he or she can profit from this in the West. The very same tendency can be found in the pop music industry.

Taiwan: A religious group in Taiwan managed to get the goverment to ban the singer and rapper Singa Rinpoche from entering the country for one year. However, the ban only increased his popularity among the young Taiwanese audience, and it was said to have promoted the sales of his album.

USA: The American country band Dixie Chicks caused uproar among many US country music fans for saying they were “ashamed” of President George Bush, resulting in death threats, radio censorship, boycotts, cancelled shows and plunging record sales. They were labelled as “Nashville refugees”. Most likely as a result of it all – not to mention the documentary film about the incident, ‘Shut Up & Sing’ – the group was celebrated with five prizes at the 49th annual Grammy Awards in USA on 11 February 2007.

USA: When webloggers started mentioning the word ‘banned’, the news about Stuck Mojo‘s new music video spread quickly. The popular web sites iFilm and YouTube were claimed to have censored their anti-jihad music video, and as the censorship debate continued, it also increased media attention for the band – a controversial rap metal group from Atlanta, Georgia. Soon band leader and guitarist Rich Ward appeared as a guest on Fox News’ tv show “The Big Story with John Gibson”.



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Related reading on freemuse.org

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Related reading on freemuse.org

Max and Xavi, percussionists of Ojos de Brujo (Catalonia/Spain) was interviewed by Freemuse / Eric Silva Brenneman at Roskilde Festival, 26th of June 2003.

Seldom do you hear of a band that throws Spanish Flamenco, Caribbean Cumbia, and Spanish Hip-Hop in a blender to produce a very unique and extremely entertaining musical style. This is Ojos de Brujo from Barcelona.


Watch interviewPart I
Has Ojos de Brujo ever experienced any form of musical censorship?

Xavi
Max
Xavi and Max from Ojos de Brujo