Ukraine: Italian opera singer cancels concerts in Crimea

Ukraine_Safina

After the Ukrainian Ministry of Culture said on 18 January 2016 that it would cancel Italian opera singer Alessandro Safina’s concerts in the country since he also scheduled performances in Crimea, the singer announced on 22 January 2016 that he would cancel his two dates in the contested region, reported Ukraine Today.

Safina said he doesn’t get politically involved in his work and blames his Crimean promoter for putting him in a “bad light”, and wrote the following statement on his Facebook page:
“As a result of the unreasonable and selfish behaviour of this person, who tried to compromise me using disinformation and scandal in order to give my decision political undertones, I decided to cut all ties with him and to once and for all cancel two Crimea concerts.”

On 18 January 2016 Ukraine’s cultural minister Vyacheslav Kyrylenko posted this statement online:
“On February 21-22 Safina will give concerts in the occupied Crimea in violation of Ukrainian laws. Then he plans to perform in another five cities of Ukraine. However these concerts will never take place,” said on 18 January 2016. Those who violate the regime of entry and exit from Crimea automatically fall under sanctions. Organisers must have forgotten to notify the singer about it.”


Sources

» TASS – 22 January 2016:
Italian tenor Alessandro Safina cancels his shows in Crimea

» Ukraine Today – 22 January 2016:
Alessandro Safina cancels concerts in occupied Crimea

» Unian – 18 January 2016:
Ukraine bans Italian opera singer’s concert for his plans to sing in Crimea

» Ukraine Today – 18 January 2016:
Ukraine plans to ban Italian opera singer if he performs in Russian-occupied Crimea


Related information

» Artsfreedom.org – 23 February 2015:
Ukraine: Three Russian films banned

» Artsfreedom.org – 15 December 2014:
Ukraine: Ban on films featuring Russian actor who supports separatists

» Freemuse.org – 20 October 2014:
Russia and Ukraine: Musicians caught between conflict, bitter rhetoric and outright bans